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Art in the 21st Century

students collaborating on coding project

Growing up in a culture of Wikipedia versus hardbound encyclopedias and Wii Fit versus the gym, some argue that technology and video games are becoming too popular with kids and teens these days. On the flipside, in our digital age, technology will continue to advance and the fact that kids and teens recognize this is not only positive – it sets them up for success in college and can even shape their future careers. Need proof? Just take a look at a few of our Do Something BIG success stories and see how technology is changing the world – and changing the lives of kids and teens – fostering an outlet for creativity and art in a way we never could have imagined.

In the Fortune article entitled “Computer games as liberal arts?” David Kirkpatrick explains that “though many adults imagine the frightening Grand Theft Auto when they think of video games, kids appear to be subtler thinkers on the subject. Not only do many of them intuitively realize that games can embody any values and be on any subject, many want to make games themselves.”

It’s not uncommon for kids take apart and re-build their computers, assemble their own robots, or try their hand at creating video games and mobile apps. Soon, they’re looking for an outlet to gain more technological knowledge in their field of choice.

That’s where iD Tech CampsiD Gaming AcademyiD Programming Academy and iD Visual Arts Academy come in, allowing kids and teens – of various levels of interest and expertise – to gain real-world experience taught by inspiring industry professionals. Kirkpatrick explains how this works:

Some educators [like iD Tech Camps] are going a step further, teaching kids to make the games themselves. It turns out to be perhaps the ultimate form of liberal arts. In order to create a computer game you have to think about the content. You have to write a script. The programming involves logic, math and science. And to understand how you distribute a game you have to get into issues of marketing, sociology, and Internet culture.

Recognizing a need for this type of creative, technology-based educational opportunity, iD Tech Camps offers young people a wide array of course options ranging from video game design to programming and robotics to video editing and photography.

It’s opportunities like this that allow students to thrive. After attending camp, kids gain valuable skills while new ideas take shape and passions are developed. Students even have the option to stay overnight on-campus at more than sixty prestigious university locations, introducing them not only to their potential college major through courses at camp, but allowing them to explore – and live on – a real university campus like Stanford, NYU or UCLA. This well-rounded experience culminates in a project that students take home on a USB drive at the conclusion of camp, giving them the opportunity to take their learning even further.

So the answer to Kirkpatrick’s question is a resounding YES! Computer games (and technology in general) have indeed become our recent generation’s creative, liberal arts movement. We’ve seen this pattern develop first-hand for years with our students. Just as writers pen novels and artists paint on canvas, video game designers, programmers, and web developers write, plan and draw out their own masterpieces. They create works of art for our digital world – and kids and teens are at the helm.

Want to cultivate crazy talent and develop serious tech skillz while having an amazing summer camp experience? You’re in the right place. We’re proud to be the world’s #1 technology camp.